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Keeping your clients and prospects in mind for the heck of it.
By Dan Goldberg

If you treat your business resources with the respect and caring that you would like, you'll find out how loyalty will build and how hard it will be for either of you to let go of your business relationship.

It seems like every time a hot prospect surfaces or a client's contract is about to expire a loud speaker goes off in a salesperson's head that says "attack". Almost everyone is guilty of this behavior. We are motivated to make our numbers, save our resources, build our books of business and make money. Americans are instant gratification animals.

However there's a more stable and consistent approach that we know works, yet so few of us use it with any regularity. It's having the where with all to know that just stopping by and saying "Hi", sending a card, calling to see how everyone is, may be the easiest way of holding onto or getting new business.

It boils down to looking at clients and prospects as friends or family members. You, hopefully, phone your mom, spouse, kids, etcetera, to see how things are going, well why not do that with clients and prospects. A word of warning: don't do it every other day, or with some annoying and phony premise.

If you treat your business resources with the respect and caring that you would like, you'll find out how loyalty will build and how hard it will be for either of you to let go of your business relationship.

Find out your client or prospect's birthday and send them a card and make sure you sign it and write a personal note. Personalizing separates your card from the hundreds of cards your client may get over the course of a year, especially during the holidays. I always felt that those printed cards with the stamped company name and/or signature were spit out without much thought or caring.

Call or stop in and ask you prospect or client if they'd like to go to lunch and stipulate that you're not going to speak about business, but that you figured they'd make good lunch company. Don't talk business

Dan Goldberg is an internationally recognized speaker, trainer, coach, business developer and management consultant. Reach Dan by phone: 215-233-5352 ; email : info@dangoldberg.com ; or visit : www.dangoldberg.com.

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